Social Business Part 1 — The stalled emergence of the social enterprise

The concept of the social enterprise is increasingly found in the news, social media and in the organizations arising to support them.  The social enterprise is expected to provide solutions to social issues while also being sustainable.  This sustainability is accomplished through a hybrid of not-for-profit and for-profit business models.  In my observation these entities start out on the drawing board as hybrids but tend to slide back towards traditional not-for-profits.   As this article will propose, we have not broken free from out-dated thinking that is needed for a new form of social enterprise to emerge.  I will present my thoughts in two separate posts.

The social sector has traditionally been not-for-profit organizations and government.  These groups addressed problems or needs where for-profit organizations were not engaged.  That is, there was no opportunity to make a profit so the private sector was not interested in investing.  The problem with this scenario is that the social problems and the cost of solving them has outstripped the supply of funding available.  On the flip side the funding that runs through the private financial system is building up and seems to be overrunning the investment opportunities in the private sector.  In parallel with these two trends the concept of social business and social finance has emerged.  Unfortunately, unlike the clear private/social poles that existed before, no one really knows how this new hybrid should work.

One thing we know from experience is that money flows quickly like water to where it can earn a return.  People and organizations don’t move at that pace.  They tend towards increment change.  As a result we are seeing social finance organizations emerging ahead of the organizations they need to invest in.  The band is starting to play but no one is on the dance floor.  We are also talking about impact investing before we fully understand what impact is and how we will measure it.  If we don’t solve this problem we will see poorly designed metrics and money chasing poor investment opportunities.  We need to shift our focus towards building sustainable social enterprises that we can invest in and we need them in large number.

For some there seems to be the expectation that existing not-for-profits and governments will tack on some form of impact measure and then carry on as usual.  This might be fine if what we have now is working effectively and efficiently and I don’t believe that is the case.  We have also seen private sector companies using superficial social measures to create the illusion of social impact.  Again most people don’t believe this is true on a wide scale.  The third alternative is the creation of a new set of organizations called social businesses.  They will have the joint social/financial outcomes baked in from the start.  The few that have been created tend to look like either a traditional not-for-profit or private sector company and mostly the former.  Founders tend to use one of these poles as a starting point when creating the business model.  With some exceptions they have not been very effective in creating large scale change or in being sustainable.

We need to break free from the status quo thinking that underlies the two primary business types in order to deal with social issues in a sustainable way.  In my next post I will discuss approaches for breaking away from these old ways of thinking that will enable us to successfully start building true social businesses.

Published by Vince Bulbrook

Vince has spent over twenty five years working with entrepreneurs providing financial and strategic advice. Much of this advice has centered on business model design and product development. Issues such as determining how to invest product development resources, pricing options, features, distribution and client requests all come in to play. For much of the past fifteen years Vince has operated a business providing CFO and strategy services to small businesses. In this period he spent three years in the product development group of a software company that had a $26-million development budget. Along with overseeing the development of a product he also worked with senior management and the other product teams to determine how to manage the product portfolio. He has advised clients in software, entertainment, digital media, publishing, retail and distribution on product pricing, feature selection, distribution strategy. Prior to founding the advisory business Vince worked with Price Waterhouse and Ernst and Young. Vince graduated from the Ivey School of Business with an HBA and is a Chartered Accountant.

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